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Showing posts from November, 2015

Pilgrim's Pride Via A Lettter

Took a minute to clean my email after putting away the fall decorations and found the following link about the Mayflower at Crestleaf Thanksgiving Genealogy:  5 Steps to Finding Pilgrim Ancestors.
I've been trying to discover who my hubby's Mayflower ancestor was for years.  I have my suspicion but no concrete evidence.
My mother-in-law used to say her family hasn't been in the U.S. very long, just since the 1700's. That always made me laugh since my maternal grandmother didn't arrive until 1913.  Hubby's father's family supposedly arrived on the Mayflower but no one could recall who the gateway ancestor was. Hubby swore that the Thanksgiving oyster stuffing (which he absolutely hated) was a hand me down recipe on his dad's side from that event.  Personally, I figured the stuffing recipe was from Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York where I have been able to trace his line.  His mom stopped making it in the 1960's because no one liked it.  She had gott…

Native American Ancestry Uncovered

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Disclosure: Genealogy At Heart may receive a small amount of compensation if you choose to purchase products via some of the links below.  Opinions expressed are my own and all products listed are what  I recommend for my personal use. In honor of Thanksgiving, I'm thinking about Native Americans.    My husband loves to go garage sailing and just discovered a children's book published by Lyons & Carnahan in 1924 titledWhy We Celebrate Our Holidaysby Mary I. Curtis.  Looking through it I was astounded at the number of holidays that are no longer celebrated, such as Bird Day, Forefathers' Day and American Indian Day:


Evidently, American Indian Day was the brainchild of the Society of American Indians who proclaimed on 25 September 1915 the purpose was to strengthen the fellowship bond between "the red men and the white." p. 73.  The New York governor agreed and the first holiday was celebrated the 2nd Saturday in May.  Other states soon followed but the date chose…

Genealogy and Your Genes - Experiencing Trauma Can Last Longer Than a Lifetime!

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links, I may receive compensation.

A week ago I attended The Science of Character Learning and the Brain Conference in Boston.  Lots of theoretical and not a lot of practical info given but one keynote session keeps reverberating in my mind.  Although the research findings are still being examined, according to Kenneth Ginsburg, MD, the line between nature and nurture is blurring.  This has implications for a genealogist and reinforces our research practices! How many times have you re-discovered that you had several ancestors in the same or similar career that you engage in today?  Of course, if you live on the family farm that wouldn’t be surprising but hubby and I have both found that we have educators back into the 1500’s.  Who would have thought?  My mom was a bookkeeper and may dad worked in a steel mill and farmed.  Husband’s dad was a chemist and his mom, a secretary.  None of our grandpare…

Visiting The New England Historic and Genealogical Society

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Last weekend I had the pleasure of researching at the New England Historic and Genealogical Society in Boston, Massachusetts.


If you’re planning a first visit, here’s some tips I found useful: The library is SMALL but filled with tremendous resources that you might not find anywhere else.Don’t let the size fool you!Obviously, the holdings are fantastic if you have New England relatives but there is also a sizable collection of Long Island and New Netherlands.My most awesome find was from Indiana, though, so don’t discount other areas!COST is free if you’re a member (about $90.00 a year) and $20.00 if you aren’t. Click for Info on Joining!I highly recommend being a member for the following reasons : First, if you’re planning on spending a few days, it’s cost effective.Second, as a member you get a lot of perks you wouldn’t get with a day entrance fee – those wonderful journal articles that the society puts out, discounted fee on accessing a genealogist, training opportunities and so on…

Being Thankful for Genealogy Goodness

Last Sunday I wrote about genealogy bullies and record thieves.  I reflected this week, and with Thanksgiving around the corner and the heinous events in Paris,  I wanted to take a moment to think about all the kindhearted genealogists out there that far outweigh the small number of bullies.  So with here's what I'm thankful for...

Maggie Landfair who responded to a Rootsweb bulletin board posting I did in 1999 and provided me with so much info she had collected on her husband's side and put me in touch with the author of two Leininger books so I could learn about my dad's side of the family.  Bob Leininger who shared his electronic files with me while he was half way around the world.  I've referred to those documents (and his books) time and time again.  Just wish he would update them! Hint, HintEdgar Duer Whitley who somehow figured out that my DURE family should be DUER and shared his lifelong work with me just weeks before he passed away.  I never found out how…

The Genealogical Clock Timer Has Been Set...

I received via email notification last Friday that my Certified Genealogist preliminary application was received. Hooray! I immediately accepted the invite to join the Google+ candidate group, downloaded and printed the FAQ and 1st month recommendations attached to the email, texted family and friends and after the excitement passed, realized I have a lot to accomplish in a little time!  Actually, 11 months and 2 weeks until the portfolio is due.  Since I travel for business once a month I lose a lot of time so I have to develop a workable plan to meet the deadline.
I reviewed the suggested timeline before submitting the application and thought it best if I worked on one portfolio requirement in depth during each of my upcoming school breaks - Thanksgiving, Christmas, Spring and then using my earned vacation time since I work 12 months to complete anything left to do.  That plan was great in theory but as the holidays approach I realized it wasn't going to work.  I'm the go to…

Beware of Genealogy Bullies and Record Thieves!

Bullying is often an overused term to describe boorish behavior.  Disrespectful behavior alone, however, does not accurately describing a bully.  A bully is “a blustering browbeating person; especially: one habitually cruel to others who are weaker.”1  Habitually being the key word here, a bully must repeatedly and regularly act in a threatening way.   When a bully is mentioned most visualize a schoolyard thug or an overbearing boss.  But bullying isn’t solely dependent upon face-to-face contact; online bullying is rampant and the field of genealogy is affected. On several occasions someone has tried to bully me online.  I don't like to report people as I am a proponent of free speech, however, when an individualrepeatedlythreatens than I believe the individual’s right to free speech needs to be reined in by the online community. I first encountered a genealogy bully in 2009.  I received an email regarding my public tree on Ancestry.com from a woman who claimed my documented 4thgreat…

A Serendipitous Burial Location

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In my last blog I wrote about how I felt after getting "a sign" regarding my decision as to where to inter my mom's cremains.   Today, I want to let you know about a serendipitous burial location for my mom's best friend: My mom met Helen when we relocated to Florida in 1973.  The two worked together at Montgomery Wards and shared many common interests. After my mom died, I continued to send Helen, who had left the area, Christmas cards with an update on my family. In early July of this year, I received the email below:
"Hi, Just wanted to let you know that my Mother passed away on the 21st.  She was 89 years old and was as ready as anyone could be to go home to Jesus.   My wife and I are going through her things at our house and I've noticed cards from you for many years.  I'm not sure exactly who you are or what church you went to but it seems you and my mother were close at one time or the other... 
Sincerely, Bill" 
(Note to self:  Remeber to keep your o…

Butterflies and Flowers - A Mother's Message of Love From Beyond

I've been blogging about synchronicity - those meaningful coincidences that occur - and genealogy. I'm going to blog about events that I cannot explain but held a powerful message to my immediate family and I. Here's what happened.
First, a little background information.  I am an only child and was extremely close to my mother. Today is All Saint's Day, and although my mom won't be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church, she's the closest person I've ever known that espoused the characteristics of a saint.  An uneducated, single mom at a time when the world did not look favorably on divorce, my mom always put my needs and wants above her own.  A hard worker, she never complained about her lot in life and always spoke up for the underdog. Material things were of no interest to her. She preferred to be outside, enjoying nature, or reading a book.  She especially loved butterflies and could spend hours watching them dance among the flowers.
In January of my 2n…