Posts

A Loss for Tampa Bay

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The John F. Germany Public Library in Tampa, Florida holds one of the largest genealogical collections in the southeast United States.  I visit often and have always found the staff to be professional and helpful.  Last month, my visit there saddened me.
I planned to drop off some donated books and as it was thundering, decided to park in the adjoining parking garage.  It was mid-day and the lot was just about filled.  I thought I was lucky to find one of the few remaining spots on the top floor.  I took the elevator to the tube that joins the garage with the library.  When I approached the library doors I was shocked to find them boarded up.  I guessed that the facility was being renovated.  I walked a level down and then half way around the block to enter from the front.  Stopping at the information desk, I asked for the acquisition clerk who was expecting me.  "I'll have to take you up because the elevator needs a key for that floor," was the response.  I thought tha…

The U.S. - A Nation of Immigrants

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Although my family lore claimed I had Native American blood, DNA has proven that the legend was not true.  I seldom (well, have never) written about current political issues as that is not the point of my blog.  That changes today.

If you reside in the United States, you have an ancestor who once emigrated here.  You're probably also a mutt like me - that great melting pot permitting people to marry due to love and not by ethnicity alone has created a wonderful mix of blended cultures, customs and genetics.

I'm blessed that my family has been here awhile.  My most recent immigrants were my maternal grandparents, John and Mary Kos[s] who naturalized in the 1940's.  My grandmother visited the Old Country nearly 50 years after she had emigrated here with her parents and was so thankful they had made the difficult journey in her childhood, she promptly kissed the soil when she arrived back in the states.  My grandfather had no desire to return, even for a short visit.

Because…

Free Genealogy Resources

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Ancestry.com has kept their promise and is continuing to work on restoring Rootsweb.com, which they now own.  Recently, an updated Rootsweb Wiki has become available and it's free!

Rootsweb is one of the original Wikis - places on the web that allows for collaboration in editing and structuring revolving around genealogy.  Back in the day, say circa 1999, I had several trees posted there and I reached out for help via the Message Boards.  I was rewarded with lots of suggestions, hints and occasionally, a tidbit of a genealogy gem that propelled me forward.

In its present form, links are provided to pages that provide important information about the  records  (Censuses, Immigration, Military, Vitals, Various Types), Societies, and Research (Town, County, State, African American, Jewish).   It's a wonderful place to gain an Ah ha moment and might just explain why you can't find Great Grandpa Ed in the 1900 U.S. Federal census. 

Two additional resources that are extremely v…

Another Duer Synchronicity

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The universe has made some odd Duer connections for me lately and I just have to share!

For my new readers, I've been enamored with my Duer lines for the past several years after I received an out of the blue email from a Duer genealogist who informed me I had wrongly recorded the surname as Dure in my Ancestry.com tree.  Edgar sent me an electronic version of his work which went back generations and within two weeks, he died.  The good news was that he got the information out before he passed; the bad news was I could never ask him questions or collaborate on further research with him.  The odd thing about that email was that it did not go through Ancestry but Edgar had somehow gotten my personal email.  I never learned how he tracked me down.  It also was received at a time I was extremely busy with family matters that strengthened the Duer connection.

The weirdest occurrence at the time I received the information was to discover one of my children had followed the same path as…

Another Family Story Shattered!

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You know the feeling when you discover a long held belief isn't what you thought?!  Shocked, Saddened, Denying it, Attempting to disprove the new information - yep, those stages of grief.  But learning the truth is important and I know it can change my genealogy sleuthing to find what I really need to get a better understanding of the family.
I've written previously about one of my husband's great grandmothers, Mary "Mollie" O'Brien, who with her purported half sibling, ventured to New York City during the height of the Potato Famine from Ireland.   Cousins and I have surmised that Mollie and her sister must have been orphaned as Irish church and civil records show no trace of her parents after her Baptism in Limerick.  This would explain why she set out for a new life in a new land. Mollie worked as a maid in New York City and it was there she met Scotts immigrant, John Cook.  After a brief courtship, the couple "eloped" via Newark, New Jersey whe…

Hunting Down a Harbaugh

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I was catching up on my reading last week when I came across an article in the May 2018 Smithsonian magazine mentioning a George Harbaugh, an oil magnate from Cleveland who was involved in an automobile accident with a streetcar in 1913.  This led to an engineer, James Hoge, inventing traffic lights.
Now when you do genealogy for awhile and you're reading for pleasure, surnames are certain to pop up from time to time and you just lose the drift of the story to think, "How is that person related to me?"  or  "Do I have that individual in my tree?"  I have entered every Harbaugh that I'm aware of in my Main Tree on Ancestry.com and MyHeritage.com so I decided to try to hunt down this George Harbaugh and attach the citation.
I thought this would be a quickie find but it took a few minutes longer than I anticipated.  My first problem was that I have 132 George Harbaughs in my tree.  I tried to eliminate by location and death dates but it was still a lot to go …

Be Mindful of Address Changes

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On the plane returning home from New Mexico, I sat next to a woman who had traced her paternal grandfather's side back to the 1200's in a Spanish village thanks to the church records and her ability to decipher old handwriting.  She mentioned that she had found several deeds belonging to her great grandparents but could not locate the residences as the numbering system had changed in the past 100 years.  Lucky for her, she met an elderly man who remembered the family and understood the new address system so she was able to identify where her grandfather and great grandfather were born. Taking into account address changes is an important point to remember as what you're looking at might not be what you think it was.

There are two websites available to help with situations like this.  Whatwasthere.com is a site using Google Street View with uploaded photos of what the area looked like from previous time periods.  You can assist this project by uploading old photos you may h…