Sunday, October 22, 2017

Organizational Article You Must Read

I came across the following article in the Washington Post this past week and I had to share it with you - Americans are Pack Rats.  Yes, we are!  I had read this shortly after blogging an article for another genealogy organization about an experience I had with a pack rack relative and my frustration in not being able to locate a photo because I kept getting the response, "Well, it's around here somewhere." 
My genealogy is well organized but occasionally, I have difficulty putting my hands on something I know I have. My most recent mysterious disappearance is of 2 handwritten letters for the eBook I'm currently working on.  I've transcribed the letters but for the life of me can't locate the originals.  I've always kept the entire set together in the same order that I scanned them.  After scanning, I transcribed the letters in order.  The first letter and one written 13 months later have disappeared, along with the scan.  The transcription remains.  I'm considering this my Spooky October Happening as I have one or more each year; some unexplainable genealogical occurrence that is just weird.  I'm hoping by November I can recover the documents. 
But back to the article, I'm thinking that if the author's approach is culturally established, it sure explains why my husband's side didn't have a lot of hand me downs.  I'm still searching for a pic of his great grandmother, for goodness sakes. 
I understand the article's author's motives but I think that I'd like to continue to use the family china until I'm either unaware of my surroundings or die.  I wouldn't want it pitched after my death so I think some items just ought to stay with the current owner until the very end.  I use the label system.  On items that have family value, I've placed a label on the bottom with the name of the original owner.  That way, my descendants can easily identify that it's an item that had significance.  Whether they pitch or not is up to them.  Knowing my family, they'll keep it or pass it along to a family member who would continue to value it. 
This isn't a pleasant thought but end planning is necessary long before your life ends. 

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Genealogy Is Not For The Faint of Heart


Yesterday was our local genealogy group's Family History Support Day.  We had a wonderful turnout - larger than ever! The free event matches people with no genealogy experience with a researcher who can help them get started or provide ideas to overcome a family mystery. 
A few of the folks I helped were stunned by the results.  The DNA testing companies now include a warning but I'm thinking all genealogists might want to do so.  Uncovering family secrets is often hard to deal with. 
Here's the 5 pieces of info I uncovered that I had to share with visitors that left them rattled:

1. Cherokee Princess - Her question - What was the name of my great grandma that was a Cherokee princess?  A great uncle told the woman that because they were of Native American royalty, they escaped the Trail of Tears and remained in South Carolina.  First problem with the legend is that South Carolina wasn't one of the 9 states that fell under the Removal Act.  Most of that region's Native Americans relocated to Florida and formed the Seminole Tribe.  Second problem is the law didn't exclude any group so even if she was related to a Native American leader, aka "royalty,' her family wouldn't have been permitted to remain.  Third problem is the Trail of Tears was in the early 1800's so the family member involved would have been more generations back then a great grandmother.  I identified on her maternal line her great grandparents; they were all born and died in South Carolina and were all identified as Black.  I recommended DNA to verify if she has Native American ancestry. 
2.  Only Child - Her question - "My parents divorced when I was small and my mom and I moved from Florida where I was born to New York where I grew up.  I think we stayed with a relative in New York but I was small and don't remember.  How can I find out who we stayed with as my mom is deceased and I'm an only child."  Lucky for the woman, this wasn't difficult to find as she's in her 80's so she was in the 1940 US Federal census.  What she initially failed to tell me was that she had changed her birth name under which she was enumerated.  I first looked for her in New York but didn't find her.  I then looked for her in Florida but she weren't there.  I then did a search without a location and still couldn't find her.  I then looked using her mother's name and voila - found them in South Carolina (yes, there was a lot of people from South Carolina and Georgia yesterday which isn't surprising since that's all the same temperate zones and farmers migrated between those areas).  When I showed her the record I thought that the enumerator had mistakenly put her father's name as hers; that's when she told me that was her birth name but she had changed it to a more feminine name.  I asked about the 11 month old sibling enumerated after her.  She was stunned.  The sibling had been named after her grandmother who she thought might be the family member they had been living with.  I found the grandmother living in the same district with an uncle and his family.  I wasn't able in the short time period to figure out what happened to her sister.  She may have died or is still out there having been adopted.  It was hard for her to move forward with her initial question since the discovery was made.  I found her mother in the 1930 US Federal census living with a family in Florida.  The name was familiar to her; it was her great aunt's family.  The cousin had gotten married and divorced and relocated to New York in 1940.  Although she wasn't living with her on enumeration day, it's likely that was the New York connection.  I recommended she get in touch with the woman's grandchildren as she and her only son are deceased, to see if they have further information. 
3.  The Reason Grandpa Left  Grandma - Her question - "I'd like to find out why my grandfather took my mom away from my grandmother and gave her to my aunt to raise."  This is a tricky question because a family might not have left guardianship records that could tell us what was happening.  The grandmother could have been ill - physically or mentally, incarcerated or dead.  I didn't find a death date so I turned to census records to discover where the family was located.  Grandma had been born in 1915 in South Carolina.  She had told her daughter she remembered living with her parents until right before she started school.  That means, she would have been 5-7 years old.  The great grandparents and grandma were not found in the 1920 US Federal census anywhere.  That's explainable as supposedly great grandpa was a traveling salesman.  The family probably missed being enumerated in their travels.  Their circuit was the entire southeast region.  I found that great grandpa died in 1922 in South Carolina.  I also found that great grandma had another child but it wasn't with great grandpa - the father's name was recorded as "DK" (don't know).  That child died soon after he was born in 1921.  Although unconfirmed, it's likely that the great grandparents split up due to great grandmother's pregnancy from another man.  Great grandpa, in poor health and traveling, placed his daughter with his sister's family to give her stability.  The great grandma died in the 1930's and had resumed using her maiden name.  Everyone from that generation are deceased so the real reason may never be uncovered.
4.  Darn Those Genes! - Her question - "I'd like to find out about my dad's side because my parents were divorced and all I know was that he was mean like his dad."  So the counselor in me kicked in to ask her to elaborate on what she meant by the word, "mean."  She said she didn't remember him but he supposedly was abusive after drinking which he did all the time.  I had just begun to try to identify vitals on her father when her cell rang.  It was her son calling and by the time she got it out of her purse, she had missed the call.  She became quite upset because her son was incarcerated from selling drugs and they could only speak weekly.  I asked her if her son was also an alcoholic but that hadn't been his drug of choice.  She mentioned her daughter and adult grandchildren who had no drug issues.  She couldn't understand her son's life choices.  I recommended that when he's released, the family get their DNA done and upload it to promethease.com.  For $5.00 an analysis, the family will be able to identify their health indicators, addiction being one of them.  Although genetics alone does not preclude one to make a life choice, it does explain why some have more difficulty then others.  She was very appreciative.  She had never thought about her father's influence continuing in his absence.  My new genetic slogan - Gone but not forgotten.
5.  That's Not How You Spell It - Her question - "Should I go to Salt Lake City or a library in Minneapolis to find out who my great grandparents were because I can't find them online?  Someone has my family in their tree online but it's not my people."  The simple answer is - maybe.  This woman had a huge binder full of family info which is awesome but the problem was that it was in no order whatsoever.  We wasted a lot of time as she tried to find simple information, such as her parent's vitals.  She guessed her mom died in 2011 but it was 2001.  She thought her mom had died in one Florida county but it turned out she was in a neighboring county where she had been taken to a specialized hospital.  It took us about an hour to get to her grandparents as she shuffled through her binder and would get sidetracked when she came to a picture.  Her question then changed to "How can I identify these people?"  My advice to her, which I wrote down, was to first organize the binder by generation.  Make it into a timeline beginning with birth and going through death of her parents.  Buying dividers that were oversized so that she could label the generations for quick info retrieval.  I made by hand, a skeletal pedigree chart and explained how to use a group sheet so she could place the group sheet in the front of each section.  She had more info, such as death certificates, in her safety deposit box.  I recommended she make a copy and include those, too.  She was quite upset about the wrong info online.  It turns out it wasn't wrong.  She was adamant the surname spelling ended in "son" but the online tree had "sen."  I told her that spelling was optional prior to the last century.  Census records showed that her great grandparents did not read or write.  Enumerators wrote names phonetically.  So, should she go to Salt Lake or Minneapolis?  No need to for an answer to the question she had but of course, if she needs to once she organizes what she has. 

In five hours, five ah ha moments that shook folks' core beliefs.  Genealogy is definitely not for the faint of heart.


Sunday, October 8, 2017

It's Family History Month


Since 2001 in the U.S., Congress deemed October as Family History Month.  If you're new to genealogy it's the perfect time to get acquainted with your local society as many offer free events that will help you get on the fast track.  Next Saturday, my county group is hosting a get started event at a mid county library.  A neighboring county has provided free scanning of heirloom photos and documents, overcoming brick wall help and youth activities to get the next generation involved.  How to find these events?  Check your local library and historical museums, the newspaper and Facebook. 
If you are a well seasoned genealogist then it's your turn to step up and assist at one of the offered events.  Sharing your expertise, I've found, is rewarding on so many levels.  You've exercised your brain muscles and experienced the joy that comes with helping someone solve a mystery.  You may even find a connection to your own family! 
If you're unable to attend an upcoming event, you can celebrate in a variety of ways.  This year, by posting my husbands, adult child and my dna on several sites, I've connected with many 2nd and 3rd cousins I would never have been able to do locally.  In just the past 2 weeks, I've had 3 photos of my dad from World War II mailed to me.  I'd never seen these photos before and would never have viewed them if I hadn't posted my dna results.  Last October, a family member of my mother's closest friend found me online and sent me a copy of my wedding announcement.  Sure, I had one, but it was special to know that someone besides family had treasured it for over 40 years.  Over the summer, a cousin on my husband's side was preparing to renovate and discovered letters that had been sent to her grandmother that were written by my husband's grandmother.  She mailed them to us.  I highly recommend having your dna done and posting it but be forewarned - if you aren't able to emotionally handle the horror that might result in finding out you aren't who you thought you were then skip the test!  Ironic, isn't it, that Family History Month starts with warm autumn days and ends with Halloween night. 
Another celebration idea is to pull out your old photo albums and using a stickee, tab the pages with 12 of your favorite photos.  I've used them in a rotating frame in my office as they make me smile and put me in the right mood to research that particular line.  If you are a paper calendar type, then use the photos to replace the ones that came with it or have a company make one professionally for you.  Sometimes you can get bulk pricing with the extras being given as family gifts for the upcoming holidays.
Last week I wrote about heirloom cookbooks.  If you checked any you own, make a dish this month that your family had enjoyed.  You'd be surprised how the smell and texture of food can bring back an old memory and just might provide the hint you need to move forward with your research.
Three simple ideas for the three weeks left in this month (where is the time going?!)  Enjoy!

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Genealogical Gems Hidden In A Cookbook


Do you own a treasured family cookbook?  I have several from my maternal grandmother and my mother-in-law.  We don't think of these hand me downs as genealogical gems but they are!  Take the time to look through each book carefully.  I love the dedication that my mom and aunts wrote to their mom.  They always noted the holiday - Mother's Day, birthday or Christmas - and the year the gift was presented. 
A dog eared page or starred recipe tells much about the previous owner's family, as well.  I come from a long line of sweet toothed individuals and the favorite recipes of old confirm my sugar cravings.
Sometimes you might find a letter or note that was used as a bookmark.  Family relationships and residential addresses can be gained, along with some family gossip.   
If you've obtained community cookbooks then you may win the genealogical prize find.   This type of cookbook combined submitted recipes from members of a local church or civic organization.  Not only will you confirm your family member's name and group affiliation, you'll also identify their favorite food.  Not sure if you're family member's cherished recipes were included?  Visit vintagekitchenheave.etsy.com and omnivorebook.com.  Look for the time period and location where your ancestor resided.  For a low price, you might just discover tasty morsels both edible and historical. Bon Appetit!

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Amazing Info Found - The Net As a Beginning Tool

Life has returned to semi-normal after the recent hurricanes.  By semi, I mean the county still hasn't collected the debris, milk and gas aren't available everywhere and several parks remain closed due to damage.  When our power was out for several days, I limited my internet usage to conserve my cell phone battery.  It wasn't until I went to clean my spam filter for my website, Genealogyatheart, that I discovered a message from a distant cousin.  He had discovered my site and our connection through our great grandfather by simply Googling the last name.
I replied to his comment and he included one of his nieces on our messages. Between the 3 of us, family puzzles began to be solved quickly. In the past week, I discovered that my paternal grandparents had hosted a small family reunion at their farm in the 1960's.  My parent's divorce was finalized by that time so my mom knew nothing of the event.  Without my cousins input, I wouldn't have known about it, either.
That got my brain going about unidentified people on an old movie I had inherited from my father.  Hubby and I have had all our 8 mm films and VHS tapes professionally saved to a DVD.  (Side note:  If you think your VHS tapes aren't so old they need to be saved, think again.  The oldest VHS tape from 1984 was fading away while some of the 1950 movies looked as good as new).  The DVD contains still photos of some of the movies so hubby took those of the mystery people, along with another CD we had made of all the old family photos we had scanned years ago, and sent them off to both cousins for help in identifying these unknown folks.
We're fairly certain that the picture above is of my grandmother, Lola, and her older brother, Stanley.  Why?  I have the photo and they have the photo.  They are descended from Stanley and it was in their box of photos of his family.  My step mother had placed all the old photos in one box so I was never sure who any of my unlabeled people were.  Were they a Leininger, Landfair, Kuhn, Kable, Kettering, Bollenbacher, Adams or Duer?  I had tried the old Google Picassa facial recognition feature and it helped somewhat but I didn't have enough identified photos to have it match effectively.  
These cousins sent me a few other photos electronically over the past week to see if it would help but Picassa is no longer supported by Google and it kept freezing so no answers there! I'm hopeful they'll be able to match some of the photos on the CD to photos in their box so at least we can categorize by surname.
The cousin who initially contacted me stated their tale is that the family originated from Ireland and not Bavaria as my line recalled.  I tend to believe them for several reasons.  I've had another family member misidentified's country of origin as Germany instead of being born in the U.S.  Maria Duer Kuhn's death certificate states she was born in Germany but she was born in Ohio.  Her son was the informant.  Her husband was the one born in Germany.  It seems like my Great British ancestors assumed the German culture of those they married in Ohio.  Additional support for their story is that my DNA has a much higher likelihood of Great Britain then it does of German.  Further, Landfair is not a German surname.  When I questioned that years ago I was told that it probably had been changed from Lamphere.  Could be but no proof of that was ever discovered.
One of the cousins also has a copy of my great grandfather's funeral program which she will send me.  I've blogged about him previously - he's the gentleman who "accidentally fell from a platform" and there was a followup investigation a few months after his death resulting in additional paperwork after the death certificate.  The lesson there was make sure you get the complete records you request.
This gets me to the point of today's blog - there remains A LOT of additional information about your ancestors out there - in attics, basements and the brains of the living who recall the unrecorded stories past down.  The internet can help you get to those that hold the key you need but alone, the internet is not enough.  Reach out to long lost family and you just might discover the info you seek.  Happy Hunting!

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Genealogy Without Power


Hurricane Irma is long gone and our power has finally been restored!  Four days without electricity was challenging.  I honestly don't know how our ancestors, females especially, survived Florida's heat and humidity back in the day in those long dresses.  The cold water to bathe in doesn't help!
We were fortunate, as were most of our neighbors, in regards to physical objects being spared.  All we had was a leaning fence which we've since fixed, a broken mailbox as the wind tore off the door, several dents in my car hood and lots of vegetation debris to rake up.  Our next door neighbor lost her mother the day after the storm and our neighbor behind us welcomed a new baby.  Nothing like adding more stress to an already difficult time!  The cycle of life continues...
For me, I can't even remember the last week I spent at home and didn't do any genealogy.  It has to have been years ago.  Genealogy is so dependent upon online tools today that there was little I could do without electricity.
I was trying to limit my cell phone usage to conserve it so my response to a few clients was terse.  Two responded they didn't know I lived in the storm's path.  One had found me online and the other through a former client.  There was no need for them to know my physical location but it still surprised me that they hadn't.
I love to read out of print books but I had to limit that, too, to conserve battery life on my Kindle.  I could use my laptop for a bit to work on the current e-Book I'm writing but it's an old laptop and the battery life is short so I decided not to do that.
I had gathered all of my most precious documents and did spend about an hour reshelving them in our office.  That was the extent of my time invested in genealogy.  Now I'm backlogged and better get to work!

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Hunkered Down With the Genealogy

The rain just started pummeling us about 5 minutes ago so sorry - no post today as we're going into our closet in a minute to ride out Hurricane Irma which is expected to go right over us early tomorrow morning.  Backed up the computer on that wonderful little device I got on Amazon during Prime Days (tho I am not really happy with you - Amazon - for your price gouging last week.)  The cats must have know cause they found spots in the closet and are cozy right now.
Please send good thoughts/prayers to the peeps in Florida - we're gonna need all the help we can right now.