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Finding Photos and Memorializing the Fallen - A Unique Volunteer Opportunity

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Last blog I mentioned Joseph Reid, the father-in-law of my husband's 5th cousin twice removed.  You may be wondering why in the world I would have someone in my tree that is not related and so far removed.  Here's the deal...I have done several surname studies which includes everyone by the same surname in a particular area.  My purpose was twofold; I wanted to try to connect all the Harbaughs in the U.S. and updated the last attempt to do so, the 1947 Cooprider & Cooprider Harbaugh History book.

As was common until the 20th century, the Harbaugh couples had many children so my tree became quite large.  (I've also did a surname study of the Leiningers but they immigrated later and didn't have quite as many children in each generation but that, too, added non relatives to my tree.)

Since I have so many Harbaughs in one place and I documented each one as best as possible when I added them, I am frequently emailed about our connections.  Usually, the question is, &quo…

Beta Testing Ancestry.com's New Hint Features

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Notice the new Hints feature on Ancestry?It appears at the top of the Hints page in the middle below the ribbon:

To become a part of the Beta test group, simply toggle the button “BETA OFF” to the right to become “BETA ON.”

If you aren’t into Beta testing, here’s what changes you would see – after the two pictures of Joseph Reid, notice there is a “Quick Compare” toggle on the right side of the screen.I have the feature disabled below so all you see in the last column for the Texas, Death Certificates, 1903-1982 is Different and New:
What was different and new?  Joseph was misspelled on the Texas Death Certificate as Joshph which is why it is noted as different from what I have in my tree, Joseph.  I did not have Joseph’s spouse and children so that information would be “New” to me.    Other options are Same (for the named individual) and Match (for a spouse or child).

When you toggle from right to left the Quick Compare button, you see the following: So now I see what exactly is the…

Photo Hints You Might Find Hiding in Your Home

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I just read an article that I think you might find interesting - Lost Rolls America  is about those rolls of film you have hanging around the house that you never take to get developed.

A few years ago I had developed all of the rolls and disposable cameras (remember those?!) that were in my home.  Most of the photos were field trips my children went on and the pictures weren't all that exciting.  My family still laughs, though, at the weird occurrence that happened when I took the films in to be developed.

I was next in line at the camera counter at my neighborhood Walgreens when a woman came in and sighed loudly behind me.  Turning, I saw she was clearly in a hurry.  I smiled and said something about the line was moving quickly.  She said she was late and hoped it did.  Then she saw all the film and disposable cameras I had in a gallon size baggie.  I told her she could go ahead of me.

Just at that moment the customer who was being waited on finished.  The hurried woman needed …

Genealogy Cleaning Hints

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Since returning home from vacation, I have been on a genealogy cleaning spree.  Although I hadn’t planned for this, I discovered a few days before I left that I really had to make it my priority when I returned.  While packing, I was frantically looking for items in the closet when I got hit in the head by falling journals. Ouch!  If that wasn't a wake up call I don't what would be.
Cleaning is not fun but the results are wonderful!I have also been fortunate that the heat index has been in the extreme and when the temperature drops, it’s pouring.With both of those curtailing my outside activities, I hit the office closet first for a redo.Because I live in an area prone to hurricanes, I keep records in either plastic tubs that I can quickly transport to the car when we evacuate, or in binders high up on a shelf.The binders contain vitals by surname and though they would be a loss, the original exists safely elsewhere with a scanned copy I placed online, on my computer and back…

Cuban Genealogy

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As I mentioned in my previous blog article, last summer I had the opportunity to visit the beautiful island of Cuba.At the time, I didn’t realize how fortunate I was since travel has now recently been rescinded.In my opinion, that’s a shame.I do understand it's a political decision although I do not agree that we should not be on speaking terms with a neighbor.Cuba is only 90 miles from our nation and populated with people who are family to many of our citizens.Genealogywise, this separation saddens me.
I have not previously blogged about my trip because it was for pleasure only.I longed to go there since I was three years old; my parents used to watch I Love Lucy and although Lucy’s fake crying set me off, I was enchanted with Desi’s accent and musical skills. My mother told me he was from Cuba and in my preschool mind, everyone on the island – an island, no less – now that added to the mystique! – was as talented as Desi.Someday, I was sure to visit.
Unfortunately, as I grew up…

Even on Vacation Genealogy Abounds

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I’m back from my dream vacation in Peru.Ever since I was in the 3rd grade, I’ve yearned to travel there thanks to a National Geographic for Kids article.Finally got the opportunity and even though it was a bucket list item and not for genealogical purposes, I’m sure you’re not surprised that genealogy related happenings occurred.
Our guide, Washington, related on our first meeting that he was 50% Incan and 50% Spanish, known as a mestizo.He introduced us to one of sixty remaining shaman who lives in the Andes and speaks Quechuan.Thankfully, Washington was an awesome translator as the shaman doesn’t speak Spanish or English.Washington learned Quechuan as his mother’s side has passed it down for centuries.The shaman had his DNA done and reported he was between 96-98% Incan, depending on the test.Nice reminder that the test pool determines the percentage, even in the most remote areas of the planet! One of our stops was to visit a cemetery in Cuzco, pictured above.Families may “rent” a …

Useful Research Reminders

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Sometimes, it takes a village to solve a genealogy mystery.  Thanks to all for sharing their ideas regarding identifying my mystery man, Anton "Tony" Kos, who is buried next to my great grandfather Josip "Joseph" Kos in Gary, Indiana.  An extra special thanks to research librarian Marilyn in Lake County, Indiana, who went above and beyond my request for Tony's obit.

Since the rainy season has officially begun in Florida this morning, I'm planning on spending the weekend further researching Tony and Joseph's relationship, if any.

Here's some great ideas that genealogists recommended:
People did not always stay in one place for long.  That's especially true for laborers who went wherever work was available.  Joseph arrived in New York, traveled to Detroit, Michigan where he got a job with the railroads, relocated to Pennsylvania and followed the lines to California and then back to Chicago, Illinois where he lived in Pullman housing with his wife …